Triceratops and Other Cretaceous Plant-Eaters: Dinosaurs of North America

Triceratops and Other Cretaceous Plant-Eaters (Dinosaurs of North America)

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Triceratops and Other Cretaceous Plant-Eaters: Dinosaurs of North America

Author: Daniel Cohen

Publisher: Capstone Press, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-1560652892

ISBN-10: 1560652896

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Reading level: Ages 9 and up

Rating: 4 stars (GOOD)

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Any books donated for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

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     Cohen, DanielTriceratops and Other Cretaceous Plant-Eaters: Dinosaurs of North America (published in 1996 by Capstone Press).  Both of our boys enjoyed reading and studying about dinosaurs when they were in the early grades.  This book in the “Dinosaurs of North America” series describes what is known about three different types of plant-eating dinosaurs that lived in the United States and Canada during what is claimed to have been 140 to 65 million years ago.  Readers will discover what each dinosaur is thought to have looked like and how each one protected itself.

      We checked this book out of the library for our older son Mark to read when he was about seven years old.  Obviously, Bible believers will need to be aware of the evolutionary bias of such books.  Daniel Cohen has written many other books about dinosaurs, including three more in the “Dinosaurs of North America” series, which are Tyrannosaurus Rex and Other Cretaceous Meat-Eaters, Stegosaurus and Other Jurassic Plant-Eaters, and Allosaurus and Other Jurassic Meat-Eaters.  The four books about Triceratops, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Stegosaurus, and Allosaurus were also offered as a set.

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