Becoming the Enchantress: A Magical Transgender Tale

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Becoming the Enchantress: A Magical Transgender Tale

Author: Kristin Kowalski Ferragut 

Illustrator: Coley Dolmance Ferragut

Publisher: Loving Healing Press, 2021

ISBN-13: 978-1615995639 Hardcover

ISBN-10: 1615995633 Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-1615995622 Paperback

ISBN-10: 1615995625 Paperback

Related website(s): http://www.kristinskiferragut.com (author), http://www.LHP.com (publisher)

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages 5 – 7

Rating: No stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Children’s book

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Ferragut, Kristin Kowalski.   Becoming the Enchantress: A Magical Transgender Tale (Published in 2021 by Loving Healing Press, 5145 Pontiac Trail, Ann Arbor, MI  48105).  A wizard, the father of a son and daughter, is taking his two children for trick or treat on Halloween, the girl dressed as a dragon and the boy as a knight.  Along the way, several people mistakenly call the wizard “ma’am” or “m’lady,” and he likes it, even though the boy thinks, “He’s a sir,” so he decides to transition into an enchantress, or as the son says, “Sure, be a ‘she.’  As long as you still go out and play with me.”  So the wizard drinks a magic potion, and as the daughter exclaims, “You’re now a woman.”  The subject of this book is made clear by the subtitle and the description that says, “Becoming the Enchantress is the story of a transgender parent that faces personal longing for change. Given the acceptance and encouragement of her children, the parent magically transforms from a Wizard into an Enchantress on Halloween night.”

     In discussing this issue, first I must say that all human beings, whether we agree with their lifestyle choices or not, deserve respect as those created in God’s image.  Some people apparently think that conservatives want to round up every lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, etc., person and burn all of them at the stake.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  We can love individuals even though we do not accept or condone their lifestyle, and the fact that we refuse to endorse or promote their lifestyle does not mean that we are being hateful.  Different people have varying standards.  Those of us whose standards are based on the Bible as God’s inspired word kindly but firmly believe that the transgender movement is something wrong and not to be applauded.

     Folks who have other standards will think differently.  One reviewer called the book “a beautiful story about a life-changing transition.”  Another said that it “is a wonderful tale for anyone who has questioned their identity or has loved someone doing so.”  Still another wrote, “I am both the parent of a trans child and a therapist that supports transitioning children, teens and adults.”  So the bottom line is if you want your children to have a positive view of transgender situations, then this book is for you.  But if you believe that transgederism is not in harmony with God’s will, you will not like or want this book and likely will view it as propaganda for the LGBTQ+ crowd, especially because it features animal characters which meet children at their level of magical wonderment, where developmentally all things are possible without judgment.  I for one CANNOT recommend Becoming the Enchantress

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Fighting Devil’s Backbone, Book 1: The Shadow of E. Z.’s Fear

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Fighting Devil’s Backbone, Book 1: The Shadow of E. Z.’s Fear

Author: Tony L. Turnbow 

Illustrator: Hanson Suhendra

Publisher: Tony L. Turnbow, 2021

ISBN-13: 978-1736260807

ISBN-10: 1736260804

Related website(s): http://www.tonyturnbow.com (author)

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages 13 – 18

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Historical fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Turnbow, Tony L. Fighting Devil’s Backbone, Book 1: The Shadow of E. Z.’s Fear (Published in 2021 by Tony L. Turnbow, Franklin, TN).  It is 1809, and teenager Ezekiel, known as E.Z. (pronounced “easy”) Perkins, his widowed mother Sarah, and younger brother David leave their home in Pennsylvania, following Mr. Perkins’s death, to build a new life in the Mississippi Territory.  However, before they embark in Nashville, TN, an old boatman warns them about “The Devil’s Backbone,” the local name for the Natchez Trace which runs from Nashville, through Indian Territory, to Mississippi.  The trail is rumored to be filled with cutthroat bandits, angry Indian warriors, and monstrous creatures.  From the moment they start their journey, bandits target E. Z. because he discovers one of their secrets.  

    Will the bandits get what they want?  Do the Perkinses and their traveling companions encounter any Indian warriors?  And what happens when they leave the Trace?  Author Tony L. Turnbow also wrote the non-fiction book Hardened to Hickory: The Missing Chapter in Andrew Jackson’s Life, and has studied the history of the Old Natchez Trace for more than thirty years.  The Shadow of E. Z.’s Fear is Book 1 of the “Fighting Devil’s Backbone” series.  Tony told me, “I am writing a young adult historical fiction series with the goal of encouraging young people to take a greater interest in learning history.” 

    A historical coming of age tale, this adventure story teaches young people about the daily struggles for survival that those early Americans endured and helps them to appreciate the way things were in 1809.  Throughout the trip, the Perkins family’s survival depends upon young E. Z.’s learning which of his fears are real and which are imaginary.  Be forewarned.  In some series, each book ends with a satisfactory conclusion and merely sets the stage for the next volume.   In other series, the reader is left hanging by a thread over a cliff.  “Fighting Devil’s Backbone” is the latter. Book 2 is E. Z. and the Chikasha Warrior.

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Trapped in the Slickrock Canyon: A Mountain West Adventure

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Trapped in the Slickrock Canyon: A Mountain West Adventure

Author: Gloria Skurzynski

Illustrator: Daniel SanSouci

Publisher: HarperTrophy, republished 1994

ISBN-13: 978-0688026882 Hardcover

ISBN-10: 0688026885 Hardcover

ISBN-13: 9780688136215 Paperback

ISBN-10: 0688136214 Paperback

Language level: 3

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: said to be ages ‏9 – 12; I’d say more 12-16

Rating: **** 4 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category:  General youth fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Skurzynski, Gloria.  Trapped in the Slickrock Canyon: A Mountain West Adventure (Published in 1984 by Lothrop Lee and Shepard Books, a division of William Morrow and Company Inc., 105 Madison Ave., New York City, NY  10016).  Justin Farrell and Gina Farrell are twelve year old first cousins.  Their fathers are twin brothers.  Justin lives with his parents and three older sisters on a ranch at Harkville, AZ, near Flagstaff.  His father, William or Bill, is a rancher.  Gina lives with her dad in Denver, CO.  Her father, Dylan, is an orthopedic surgeon who has to be gone a lot, and her mother Gwen has moved to San Francisco, CA, to become a professional potter, so Gina is feeling neglected and lonely.  Dylan and Gina have come to the ranch for a visit with Justin’s family, and Justin takes Gina on a hike to see a Native American petroglyph. 

     The cousins happen upon a couple of vandals trying to steal the petroglyph and hide.  They see a Bureau of Land Management man climb up to stop and arrest thieves.   When one of the bandits, whom the other one calls Jaggers, pushes the BLM man off the cliff, Gina screams, and Justin yanks her to start running.  Jaggers picks up a rifle and begins to chase the two, shooting bullets at them.  Usually antagonistic , the cousins must work together to escape.  What happens to Justin and Gina?  Does Jaggers catch up with them?  And will they survive a flash flood?  Aside from some common euphemisms, childish slang terms, and colorful Western colloquialisms, the word “Lord” is used several times as an exclamation.  Otherwise, this book is very suspenseful and won the Spur Award for Best Juvenile in 1984.

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Timothy’s Adventures

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Timothy’s Adventures

Author: Tanya Packer 

Publisher: Westbow Press, 2018

ISBN-13: 978-1973626893 Hardcover

ISBN-10: 1973626896 Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-1777717520 Paperback

ISBN-10: 1777717523 Paperback

Related website(s): http://www.westbowpress.com

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages ‏8-10

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: General youth fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Packer, Tanya.  Timothy’s Adventures (Published in 2018 by Westbow Press, a division of Thomas Nelson and Zondervan, 1663 Liberty Dr., Bloomington, IN  47403).  Timothy lives with his mother (Mom) and grandmother (Nanny or just Nan) on the fourth floor of a big apartment building.  His father (Daddy) had been killed in a big accident two years earlier by a drunk driver, and his grandfather (Poppa) has also recently passed away.  Timothy has friends at church and at school all of whom have different backgrounds and characteristics, but he also meets some children in various situations who are not so friendly and make fun of others.  What should Timothy’s attitude be when people are mean?  How should he react in such circumstances?  Is it possible to learn any important lessons from these events?

     Getting along with others can be difficult, especially if there is something different about them.  In this book by Tanya Packer, author of Kaylee’s Adventures and Kaylee’s Easter Treasure Box, Timothy, his puppy, and his buddies make new friendships while sharing well known Bible stories that help them deal with racism, bullies, and other difficult problems that they are dealing with.  Every story can stand alone, or they can be read as part of a sequence. Each of the fifteen chapters includes a devotional for parent-child discussion time with questions meant to generate meaningful conversations for the entire family while having fun at the same time. A sequel, Timothy’s Special Christmas Nativity, is planned.

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Out of the Beaks of Birds: Our Crazy, Pesky…Verbs

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Out of the Beaks of Birds: Our Crazy, Pesky…Verbs

Author: Cinda Klickna

Illustrator: Jim Edwards

Publisher: Clovercroft Publishing, 2021

ISBN-13: 978-1954437104

ISBN-10: 1954437102

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages 2 – 7

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Children’s book

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Klickna, Cinda.  Out of the Beaks of Birds: Our Crazy, Pesky…Verbs (Published in 2021 by Clovercroft Publishing, Franklin, TN).  One spring day Dominic and Grandma look out the window at the bird feeder, and Dominic sees several colorful birds, like a red cardinal and an orange oriole.  But while listening to Grandma explain about the birds, Dominic also learns about some irregular verbs such as bring-brought-has brought and fly-flew-has flown.  What is the yellow bird that they see?  What is the past tense of go?  And what is the past participle of take?

     Ah!   A woman after my own heart.  Children need to hear and learn proper language from the time they are born.  I try not to be a “grammar Nazi,” but it irks me no end to pick up a newspaper, magazine, or book and read that “he laid down on the bed” or “she set up in her chair.”  We homeschooled both our boys, and when they started to talk, each of them, five years apart, started saying “tooken” for the participle of take.  We don’t know why or where they got that, because they didn’t hear it from us, but without our being overbearing about it, just using gentle reminders, they soon learned better.

     Author Cinda Ackerman Klickna taught middle and high school English in Springfield, Illinois, for over 25 years. Five different varieties of birds are used in the stories, and each story focuses on the use of a certain verb, with the verb tenses printed in the color of the bird in the story. The book is useful on several levels. Preschool children will learn their colors while looking at the birds and will hear correct language through listening as someone reads to them.  Early elementary students can hear correct usage and practice reading.  Older students doing reports on birds can turn to the pages in the back with facts about the birds and follow links to websites for more information.  This is a great book.

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The Seed of Faith: A Christmas Miracle

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: The Seed of Faith: A Christmas Miracle

Author: Daniel Petronelli 

Illustrator: Emily Pritchett

Publisher: Walnut Ridge Publishing Company, 2021)

ISBN-13: 978-1737485513 Hardcover

ISBN-10: 1737485516 Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-1737485506 Paperback

ISBN-10: 1737485508 Paperback

Related website(s): http://www.TheSeedofFaith.net (book), http://www.emilypritchettart.com (illustrator)

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Suitable for everyone

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: General youth fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Petronelli, Daniel.  The Seed of Faith: A Christmas Miracle Hardcover – October 26,

(Published in 2021 by Walnut Ridge Publishing Company, P. O. Box 25, West Bridgewater, MA  02379).  A father tells a story to his young daughter that had taken place forty years before. On Christmas Eve, the small mountain village of Shiloh is suffering from a severe drought.  In addition to not having water for their crops and livestock, the people have no Christmas trees.  However, a town on the other side of the mountain, Reidsville, has plenty of water and Christmas trees, but the selfish mayor refuses to allow anyone to share with Shiloh.  Two groups of young boys, one from Shiloh and the other from Reidsville, one of the latter the mayor’s son, independently hatch secret plans to climb over the mountain and see that Shiloh has a beautiful, living Christmas tree.

     Unfortunately, what the boys do not know is that a fearsome blizzard is on its way.  Can they survive the snowstorm?  Does Shiloh ever get a Christmas tree?  And what will Mayor Reid of Reidsville have to say about his own son’s involvement in the plot?   This parable of faith vividly illustrates the importance of having courage in the most challenging moments in life and knowing that God is by one’s side.  The book was a winner in the 2021 Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards, receiving a Gold in the category of Religion/Spirituality.  It certainly deserves the honor and may well become an enduring Christmas classic.

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All Things – Even Frisky

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: All Things – Even Frisky

Author: Matilda Nordtvedt

Publisher: A Beka Book (Pensacola Christian College), republished 2000

ISBN-13: 9780802410696

ISBN-10: 0802410693

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages 8-12

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: General youth fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Nordtvedt, MatildaAll Things – Even Frisky (Published in 1973 by Moody Press, a division of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, c/o MLM, Chicago, IL  60610).  Billy lives in Burlington with his dad, George, who has a new job that will keep him traveling and away from home much of the time, and their black and white puppy named Frisky.  Billy’s mother has died, and Dad has brought Mom’s younger sister, Aunt Kate, to take care of Billy.  But Aunt Kate hates dogs.   Will she ever learn to tolerate Frisky?  How does Frisky react when Billy and his friend Peter go to a “haunted” house to look around?  And what is the news that Dad and Aunt Kate have for Billy at the end?

     It is always nice to read children’s fiction books which are written to illustrate Biblical principles.  In this good novel, a young boy learns to trust that God will “work out all things together for good,” even with his dog and aunt.  There are enough touches of adventure (with the “haunted” house), mystery, and excitement to keep the reader interested.  I read a copy of the original Moody Press edition, but we used a number of the A Beka Book reading books from Pensacola Christian College in our homeschool and always found them to be excellent.

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Cornerstones

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Cornerstones

Author: Tom Gaskins Jr.

Cover Illustrator: Don Smith

Publisher: Christian Faith Publishing Inc., 2021

ISBN-13: 978-1098077112 Hardcover

ISBN-10: 1098077111 Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-1098076221 Paperback

ISBN-10: 1098076222 Paperback

Related website(s): http://www.christianfaithpublishing.com (publisher)

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Teens and adults

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Non-fiction

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Gaskins, Tom Jr.  Cornerstones (Published in 2021 by Christian Faith Publishing Inc., 832 Park Ave., Meadville, PA  16335).  Author Tom Gaskins is a life-long native Floridian who calls himself a constitutional conservative and says that he “openly, avidly, and unashamedly loves his country, the United States of America.”  The purpose of this book, copies of which were mailed out to people and churches throughout this nation, is explained by the rather lengthy subtitle: “A positive effort to support the individual, our beloved nation, while giving our civilization a lift, one person, one day at a time.  A book for all ages and through THE AGES.”   After beginning with some of the simplest of entities in our life, Gaskins moves on to many of the most complex issues of today. He tackles a wide variety of topics, including alcohol and drug abuse, economics, evolution, faith, abortion, shootings, voting, fairness, and others.  In everything he admonishes, “Follow truth, not people.”  To be honest, I personally found myself in practically 100% agreement with him.  Other people may not like the book at all, but at least it will make one think.

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Too Young

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Too Young

Author: A. Bean 

Illustrator: Thea Elliot

Publisher: The Rebel Christian Publishing, 2020

ISBN-13: 978-0983730361

ISBN-10: 0983730369

Related website(s): http://therebelchristian.com (publisher)

Language level: 2

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Ages 8-12

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Fantasy

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Bean, A.  Too Young (Published in 2020 by The Rebel Christian Publishing, 141 Sidway St., Buffalo, NY  14210).  Ten year old Tatianna T. “Titi” Williams, who with her  parents, father Trevor and mother Cecelia, has just moved from Michigan, where she left behind her best friend Sheila, to Arkansas so that her mother can pursue her job as a pediatric brain surgeon, is too young for anything. Her parents say that she is too young to understand why they had to move to a new town and a new school, and all the new neighborhood kids say that she’s too young to hang out with them. All alone, Tatianna turns to her imagination to keep her company; in her dreams, she visits another world that she and Sheila had played, with giant trees, glowing fruit, dancing children, and a mystical white buck. Then Tatianna realizes that her dreams have become reality, but none of her friends can see this new world.

     What is happening to Titi?  Where is this world which she had been imagining and now seems so real?  And will she ever make friends in her new home?  This book is listed as Middle-Grade Christian Fantasy.   A. Bean, who says, “My plan for writing is to simply bring God glory and expand His Kingdom one child, young adult, and soul at a time,” is identified as a Christian author who writes fictional stories for children that reflect the body of Christ and the Bible.  This one could be recommended especially for young people who struggle with identity issues and self worth.  There are a couple of euphemisms (gosh, gee) and some childish slang (“stick it up fatso’s butt”), but its message deals with such elements as faith, trusting God, sharing the good news with friends, and bullying.  Titi learns that she is never too young to be used by God.

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Always Love: The Timeless Story of God’s Heart for the World and What it Means for You

HOME SCHOOL BOOK REVIEW

Book: Always Love: The Timeless Story of God’s Heart for the World and What it Means for You

Author: Sara Lubbers 

Publisher: Peregrini Press, 2019

ISBN-13: 978-1999607951

ISBN-10: 1999607953

Related website(s): http://www.peregrinipress.com (publisher)

Language level: 1

(1=nothing objectionable; 2=common euphemisms and/or childish slang terms; 3=some cursing and/or profanity; 4=a lot of cursing and/or profanity; 5=obscenity and/or vulgarity)

Recommended reading level: Suitable for everyone

Rating: ***** 5 stars

(5 stars=EXCELLENT; 4 stars=GOOD; 3 stars=FAIR; 2 stars=POOR; 1 star=VERY POOR; no stars=NOT RECOMMENDED)

Category: Bible study

Reviewed by Wayne S. Walker

Disclosure:  Many publishers, literary agents, and/or authors provide free copies of their books in exchange for an honest review without requiring a positive opinion.  Any books donated to Home School Book Review for review purposes are in turn donated to a library.  No other compensation has been received for the reviews posted on Home School Book Review.

For more information e-mail homeschoolbookreview@gmail.com

Website: https://homeschoolbookreviewblog.wordpress.com

     Lubbers,Sara.  Always Love: The Timeless Story of God’s Heart for the World and What it Means for You (Published in 2019 by Peregrini Press, a division of Awen Collaborative Limited).  In Always Love, author Sara Lubbers seeks to retell the Bible’s overarching narrative as a seamless story from beginning to end.  Certainly, as Reader’s Digest found out, any attempt to condense the Biblical account always brings up the questions of what to include and what to leave out.  “Every word of God is pure…” (Proverbs 30:5).  Nothing is “non-essential.”  However, Sara does a pretty good job of choosing key stories of the Bible, many well-known but others more obscure, including even some difficult passages normally glossed over, and weaving them together into one cohesive story with the thread of God’s “Always Love.”  Of course, as she combines creative prose and theological wisdom, a little fictionalization occurs, but I found nothing out of line or beyond “poetic license.”

     In the interest of geographical accuracy, I would note that Caesarea Philippi is near the source, not the “mouth,” of the Jordan River (p. 239).  As is true of any religious book, people of different theological backgrounds may find statements with which they would disagree.  Jesus is quoted as saying, “But I can assure you that even though you don’t know exactly when the Rescuer will return, you’ll be able to look around and tell His coming is near.”  That’s not really what He said (read Matthew 24:36-51).  And Peter is quoted as saying on Pentecost, “Be baptized, letting your outer life reflect what has happened on the inside.”  This sounds a lot like the denominational doctrine of baptism as an outward sign of an inward grace.  What Peter actually said was, “Repent, and let every one of you be baptized for the remission of sins” (Acts 2:38).

     Some people may be a little uncomfortable with Jesus calling the Father “Daddy.”  I know that, when He prayed to God in Gethsemane, Jesus used the word “Abba” (Mark 14:36), which is a familiar Aramaic term of endearment that Jewish children often used when speaking to their fathers, but most of the translators have seen fit to leave it simply as “Abba,” perhaps because something like “Daddy” seems just a bit too familiar and mundane.  Other than a few minor objections such as these, the book is interesting reading.  I will add that while there are many different interpretations of Revelation, Lubbers’s description of the Apocalypse is general enough that most Bible believers should have no major problems with it.

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